The Longest Day

The summer solstice marks the official start of summer. It brings the longest day and
shortest night of the year for the 88% of Earth’s people who live in the Northern
Hemisphere.

Astronomers can calculate an exact moment for the solstice, when Earth reaches the
point in its orbit where the North Pole is angled closest to the sun. That moment will
be at 15:54 UTC on June 21. Six months from now, the sun will reach its southern
extreme and northerners will experience their shortest day of the year, at the winter
solstice.

The angle of the sun around the time of the solstice changes so gradually in relation to
the equator that the everyday observer almost can’t tell it is changing. Without
instruments, the sun appears to be in the same place for about 10 days. This is the
origin of the word solstice, which means “solar standstill.”

This slow shift means that June 21 is only about 1 second longer than June 20 at midnorthern
latitudes. It will be about a week before there’s more than a minute change to
the calculated amount of daylight. Even that’s an approximation – Earth’s atmosphere bends light over the horizon by different amounts depending on weather, which can introduce
changes of more than a minute to sunrise and sunset times.

Dream On

Do you dream of starting your own business? It’s not easy, but you can succeed if you follow
this advice from the Entrepreneur magazine website:

• Keep your vision in sight. Most great businesses start with an ambitious vision. Decide what you
want to create in clear, concrete terms, and keep your focus on your vision as you move forward.

• Be prepared to persevere. Establishing your business will take time and effort. Know that going
in, and you’ll be ready to persist in the face of obstacles.

• Plan, but adapt. A good plan is essential, but don’t lock yourself into it so tightly that you
can’t make changes along the way. Be flexible in how you achieve your goals, and you’ll move
forward more smoothly.

• Know and use your talents. Take inventory of your skills so you can put them to good use. For
whatever you don’t do well, delegate it or hire someone to do it for you.

• Don’t reinvent the wheel. Find out what others are doing in your industry, and copy their tactics and strategies. Don’t waste time developing something new when the real-world solution is right out there.

• Keep laughing. Times will sometimes be tough, but the ability to laugh at your mistakes and your luck (both good and bad) will keep you sane as you progress toward success.

 

Creatives on Creativity

Being creative all the time is hard. Writers for the Money magazine website talked to a variety of
people in creative positions to find out what keeps the spark going. Here are some of their
answers:
• Physical activity. Kuba Koziej, CEO and co-founder of Zety: “Physical activity lubricates the
rusty hinges in my brain and makes my thinking more fluid. So I often take my dog for a quick run or play around the agility park. A 10-minute break shoots some oxygen and dopamine into my system and gets my mind refreshed and creative.”

• Music. Andres Lares, managing partner of Shapiro Negotiations Institute: “To stay creative, I put on house music fairly loudly on a set of headphones. Not only does the music help focus me, others come by and only interrupt me when it’s critical.”

• Dream boards. Adamaris Mendoza, psychotherapist and relationship coach: “It might sound crazy to some, but I have a daily manifesting practice that uses a vision board. Every morning I look at an annual board full of images of my dreams. I even keep a picture of my vision board in my phone in case I need a quick pick-me-up during the day. It connects me with why I have a business.”

• Collaboration. Andrea Castro, visual artist: “To keep myself focused and inspired, I reach out to other workers in my field by phone or Skype. A one-hour talk with an artist friend, sharing our tactics, frustrations, and wins, simply fuels me to no end. It makes me want to go directly to the easel.”

• Breaks. Kat Cohen, CEO of Ivy Wise: “This may sound counter-intuitive, but I get many of my most creative ideas while working on mundane tasks, like running errands or doing administrative upkeep.

My mind is always ‘on’ — I’m constantly focusing on the students I work with and goals for my
brand. Carving out a little downtime where I can tune these big-picture ambitions out and focus in on something simple gives me the mental space I need to come up with innovative ideas.”

2231 Oak St. Vancouver, BC – SPARK PAGE

2231 Oak St.

JUST LISTED!! 2231 Oak St. Vancouver, BC