Keep Your Bestie Cool

Summer is a time for both you and your pet to enjoy the sunshine and outdoors, but along with the fun, the season also offers situations that can endanger your pet.

The Humane Society of the United States offers these guidelines for pet owners to keep their furry friends safe this summer:

Never leave your pet in the car.

During warm weather, the inside of your car can reach 120 degrees in a matter of minutes, even if you’re parked in the shade. Pets who are left in hot cars even briefly can suffer from heat exhaustion, heat stroke, brain damage, and can even die. Don’t think that just because you’ll be gone “just a minute” that your pet will be safe while you’re gone.

Practice water wisdom:

Always supervise a pet in a pool. Provide plenty of water and shade for your pets while they’re enjoying the great outdoors so they can stay cool.

If you can't stand the heat...

On hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours. Hot asphalt can burn your pet’s paws. Pets can get sunburned, too, and your pet may require sunscreen on his or her nose and ear tips.

Watch out.

Your pet can suffer from heat exhaustion and heat stroke. The signs of heat stress include heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid pulse, unsteadiness, a staggering gait, vomiting, or a deep red or purple tongue.

If your pet does become overheated, move him into the shade and apply cool (not cold) water over his body. Let your pet drink small amounts of water or lick ice cubes. If necessary, get him to a veterinarian immediately.

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